• Treasure Island “Officer’s Club,” Casa de la Vista (map)
  • 227 Avenue of the Palms
  • San Francisco, CA, 94130
  • United States

Join us at The Pasta Party to kick off IES San Francisco 2015-16 program! 

This year marks the centenary of San Francisco's Panama-Pacific Internation Exhibition (PPIE), a cause for year-long celebrations throughout the City.  Our keynote speaker, Kevin Cain, will introduce Walter D'Arcy Ryan's spectacular lighting design for the PPIE.  Director of General Electric's Illuminating Engineering Laboratory early in the last century, Ryan designed groundbreaking large-scale projects that changed exposition lighting forever.  Cain, a member of the artist collective Engineers of Illumination, will show archive footage of the PPIE's lighted works, including a 2.6 billion footcandle beam projector array called the Great Scintillator.  Kevin will also trace modern reverberations of the PPIE, from Robert Whitman's Expo 70 work in Osaka to clips from Cain's 2015 work The Illuminated Palace for the California Historical Society.

Schedule
6:00 - 7:00:  Mingling & Cocktails
7:00 - 7:45:  Dinner & Short Presentation by IES Scholarship Winner
7:45  - 8:30:  Dessert & Feature Speaker Presentation

Tickets
$35 Non-Members
$25 IES Members
$15 Students & Emerging Professionals

About The Illuminated Palace:

Architect Bernard Maybeck envisioned his Palace of Fine Arts as a fleeting ruin, a grand transplant bringing the eighteenth century notion of architectural 'follies' from the English countryside to the PPIE.  Maybeck and his Palace were both enspelled by the past; he spoke of his desire to free the Palace from the obligatory physical limitations he understood all built objects in the world must have.  If the Palace is a chrysalis, the butterfly Maybeck sought is something his contemporary Rose Macaulay sums up with her lovely phrase:  'the pleasure of ruins'.  In a new work, The Illuminated Palace, Kevin Cain uses light to explore Maybeck's fantasy of dematerializing the Palace.  Combining lensless camera techniques from the dawn of photography with contemporary digital views, Cain’s work evokes the sweet languor of a fictive past, the heart of the Palace.  Cain looks on the Palace, itself now part of our actual past, as Maybeck looked on ruins:  for delight, for reflection and humbly for context.  In a bittersweet nod to the Palace's initial planned temporality, Cain weaves into his projections a likely future in which the rising Pacific may claim the Palace and its lagoon once and for all.

More about Kevin Cain:

Kevin has explored lighting more than thirty years, working in theater, film and the art world.  Favoring collaborative work, Kevin has worked with Kiran Shiva Akal, Paul Nii, Anna Deavere Smith and Anish Kapoor, among many others.  He studied with pioneering projection, video and performance artists Christine Tamblyn, Jayne Wenger and Enrique Chagoya and received a degree from Joan Brown's Practice of Art department at UC Berkeley.  For ten years Kevin led an MFA program in computer art, guiding dozens of artists who practice today.

Kevin has led computer art and visualization research for projects for the NSF (US), CNRS (France), the American Research Center in Egypt Egyptian Antiquities Project (Egypt), the Institute for Nautical Archaeology (Egypt), l'École française d'Athènes (Greece), Lulea University (Sweden), Lund University (Sweden), and the University of California.

Kevin has completed digital capture and visualization projects for many museums, including the Egyptian Antiquities Dept. of the British Museum (London), the Metropolitan Museum’s Egyptian Art Dept. (New York), the American Museum of Natural History (New York), the Smithsonian Chabot Space and Science Center (Oakland) and the Monterey Bay Aquarium (Monterey).

Kevin founded and leads the California 501(c)3 non-profit INSIGHT (www.insightdigital.org).